Events

Events Archive


Post date: Thu, 04/29/2010 - 11:07

Mobile phones are being rapidly and enthusiastically adopted in rural and even non-electrified regions in Uganda. This trend brings with it new paradigms of access and use as phones have quickly become incorporated into the social worlds and interpersonal intricacies of village life. In this talk I will consider the dynamics of mobile phone sharing. By sharing I mean the practice of granting access or redistributing a privately-owned good without direct financial compensation. Sharing as a social practice is undertheorized but can be better understood drawing from literatures on gifting, common property, moral economy, reciprocity, and other intimate forms of exchange. In this talk I will discuss some of the distinctive issues of equality in access to technology that arise from a multitude of sharing configurations. In rural Uganda, efforts at social policing and managing social obligations were mediated and concretized by mobile phones. Patterns of phone sharing led to preferential access for needy groups (such as those in ill health) while systematically and disproportionately excluding others (women in particular). I propose a framework that takes into account the distinct roles an individual may have in relation to the phone and the benefits that accrue asymmetrically to each role. This framework may be useful for revising survey design work on technology adoption and access to suit research in a broader diversity of settings beyond the Euro-American context.

Technology & Social Behavior Colloquium

Post date: Fri, 04/23/2010 - 13:40

Friday, April 30
9:00 AM to 4:30 PM (followed by reception)
The Hagstrum Room, University Hall 201

“The ‘Traffic in Women’ and Neoliberal Circuits of Sex, Crime, and Rights”
Elizabeth Bernstein, Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and Sociology, Barnard College, Columbia University

“Excavating Sexual Citizenship: The ‘Absent Presence’ among Mexican Gay and Bisexual Male Immigrants”
Steven Epstein, Professor of Sociology and John C. Shaffer Professor in the Humanities, Northwestern University
Héctor Carrillo, Associate Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies, Northwestern University

“Getting There from Here: The Erotics and Perversity of Global Mobility in Dominican Tourism Zones”
Mark Padilla, Assistant Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education and Assistant Adjunct Professor of Anthropology, University of Michigan

Commentators: Theo Greene, Nisa Goksel, Jeff Kosbie, Kareem Khubchandani, Melissa Minor Peters, Jaimie Morse, Ricardo Sánchez Cárdenas, and James Zarsa-diaz.

This event is sponsored by the Gender Studies Program, the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Sociology, the Latina and Latino Studies Program, the Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the Asian American Studies Program, and the Colloquium on Ethnicity and Diaspora.
Professor Parreñas’s lecture is made possible by the generous support of the Edith Kreeger Wolf endowment.

Post date: Fri, 04/23/2010 - 11:53

Talk given by Ilan Meyer, PhD
Deputy Chair for MPH Programs, Sociomedical Sciences, and
Associate Professor of Clinical Sociomedical Sciences,
Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

C2S Spring 2010 Colloquium Series
Co-sponsored by Cells 2 Society and the Center on the Science of Diversity at Northwestern.

Post date: Fri, 04/23/2010 - 11:45

 Lecture by Stephan Miescher, History, University of Santa Barbara

[Abstract]

In January 1966, President Kwame Nkrumah inaugurated Ghana’s most ambitious development project, the Akosombo Dam on the Volta River. The dam created a hydroelectric power plant, which fueled an aluminum smelter and provided electricity for urban centers in Ghana and adjacent countries. The Ghanaian government, supported by foreign experts, cast the Volta River Project in terms of modernization as the engine of rapid industrialization. The flooding of the Volta basin, however, displaced 80,000 people. Whenever Nkrumah addressed the issue of resettlement, he promised that “no one should be worse off as a result of the Volta River Project.” Instead, the promoters of Akosombo highlighted the beneficial aspects of resettling 739 villages into 52 townships. The Seven-Year Development Plan called resettlement “an exercise in positive economic development on a regional basis designed to transform the areas and the lives of the people involved.” High modernist technocrats considered resettlement an opportunity for development that would propel the “backward” dwellers of the Volta Basin into modernity. The presentation charts the experience of resettlement in two locations and juxtaposes the recollections and intentions of the planners with the accounts of the people who were resettled. The paper addresses the production of historical knowledge by revealing a tension between different interpretations of the past. While the planners insist that the resettlement program was the best possible option within the constraints of time and resources, those who were resettled still debate the impact of state neglect on their communities. Moreover, the official archive of resettlement has a male bias. Oral history allows for a gendered perspective on the resettlement experience. The presentation explores how Akosombo and its grand promises have been perceived from Ghana’s geographical and political margins.

Northwestern University's Program of African Studies (PAS)

www.northwestern.edu/african-studies

Post date: Fri, 04/23/2010 - 11:35

Kira Kay, Jason Maloney, and Jon Sawyer, journalists
Thursday, May 6 at 7pm - Hardin Hall, Rebecca Crown Center, 633 Clark St., Evanston

For decades, the balance of power between strong nations was the dominant issue in international security. But today it is fragile nations that are seen by many as posing a potentially greater threat. Weak infrastructure, internal conflict, and lack of economic development provide fertile ground for trafficking, piracy, terrorism, nuclear proliferation, disease pandemics, regional tensions, and even genocide. As a result, there is a growing movement in the international community to find comprehensive ways to promote stronger nations and more effective ways to deal with those that are already on the brink of failure.

Award-winning journalists Kira Kay and Jason Maloney, co-founders of the Bureau for International Reporting, recently explored the successes and failures of international interventions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, East Timor, Bosnia, and Haiti. In collaboration with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, their series of reports aired on PBS NewsHour in 2009. Jon Sawyer, the Pulitzer Center's founding director, will offer introductory remarks about its continuing print and broadcast coverage of fragile states from around the world which is showcased on an interactive web portal: pulitzergateway.org/fragile-states.

Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies

Post date: Fri, 04/23/2010 - 11:21

For more than a century, Latin America's cities have been defined by their extreme inequalities. The result has been the proliferation of slums and
shantytowns, nestled alongside cosmopolitan centers. This talk will explore this history of urban poverty in Brazil and the rest of Latin America, highlighting contrasts with the US and pondering the slums' significance in a region striving to free itself from legacies of underdevelopment, racial injustice, social inequality, and weak citizenship. Brodwyn Fischer (Ph.D., Harvard, 1999) specializes in modern Brazil and Latin America, with an emphasis on histories of law, cities, migration and
social inequality. Fischer has also published on issues of race, criminal justice, and urban inequality in the United States and Brazil. At Northwestern, Fischer directs Undergraduate Studies in History and the Program on Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Evanston Northwestern Humanities Lecture Series
Sponsored by the Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities at Northwestern University and the Evanston Public Library

Post date: Fri, 04/23/2010 - 11:07

Neroun Phillip Ajo Kuku has served, since 2008, as the SPLM Co-Chairman for the Assessment and Evaluation Commission (AEC) of the CPA in South Kordofan, Sudan. The AEC is responsible for monitoring and supporting the implementation of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in Sudan, signed between the ruling National Congress Party (NCP) and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM), the southern-based political party, in 2005, ending the decades long civil war. Neroun was the Minister for Rural Development and Water Resources (2006-2007) in South Kordofan, Sudan. He was a founder and Executive Director (1995-2005) of the Nuba Relief Rehabilitation and Development Organization (NRRDO), a major humanitarian assistance organization and the only operational Sudanese NGO in this region. NRRDO was founded to rehabilitate and provide humanitarian assistance to southern Sudanese displaced by the civil war and to this day serves approximately 400,000 Internally Displaced Persons (IDP's). 

Neroun Phillip Ajo Kuku is at Northwestern as part of the Buffett Center's Capacity Building Good Governance Fellowship. Read more at: http://www.bcics.northwestern.edu/news/2010/03-25-Kalema.html

Post date: Fri, 04/23/2010 - 11:02

Mary James Kuku Angelo served as the Chairperson of the Health Committee in South Kordofan State and was an SPLM Member of Parliament(MP) in the outgoing State Legislative Assembly. She has been a leading spokeswoman and champion of women's and indigenous minorities' rights in Sudan through participation in international conferences across the world. She has spoken about women's issues before the Commission on Human Rights in New York. A teacher by training, Mary earned her diploma in Education from Khartoum Teachers' College. Mary James was the first woman to join the SPLM in South Kordofan, Sudan. She is fluent in English, Arabic, Amharic (Ethiopia), Swahili, and her local Nuba language.

 Mary James Kuku Angelo is at Northwestern as part of the Buffett Center's Capacity Building Good Governance Fellowship. Read more at: http://www.bcics.northwestern.edu/news/2010/03-25-Kalema.html

Post date: Fri, 04/23/2010 - 10:59

Saturday, May 1

Location: Forum Room, Northwestern University Library, Evanston Campus

10:00 am       Tiga:  Haiti, Dream, Possession, Creation, Folly (Arnold Antonin, 2004, Haiti, color, DVD, 52 minutes)

11:00            Mario Benjamin (Irène Lichtenstein, 2008, Switzerland/Haiti, color,                    DVD, 53 minutes)

Location: Block Cinema

12:30            Of Men and Gods (Laurence Magloire and Anne Lescot, 2002, Haiti,                    color, Beta SP, 52 minutes)

1:30             Poto Mitan (Renée Bergan and Mark Schuller, 2009, USA/Haiti, color,                    Beta SP, 50 minutes)

2:30             The Agronomist (Jonathan Demme, 2002, USA/Haiti, color, 90 minutes)

Location: Kaplan Center, Kresge Hall Room 2-380

4:15            Roundtable discussion, with invited guests Ludovic Comeau, William Balan-Gaubert, and Scott Durham.  Moderated by Doris Garraway

5:15            Reception

In the weeks since the apocalyptic disaster that claimed thousands of lives and left countless wounded and homeless, Haiti has been made visible to Western eyes primarily as a victim, once again, of chance, poverty, and underdevelopment. In response to the tragedy and the general vacuum of knowledge about Haiti that it has exposed, this film series will present provocative and enlightening works produced by, for, or about Haitians prior to the earthquake.

This program seeks to raise awareness of the country’s history, cultural traditions, contemporary geopolitical predicament, and struggle for democracy, and to open up a dialogue about the future of cultural expression in Haiti. Films include the Chicago premiere of Moloch Tropical, the latest film by acclaimed Haitian director, Raoul Peck, and several award-winning documentaries on Haitian visual arts, literature, religion, politics and society.

Films will be screened in French, Creole and English, with English subtitles.

Organized by Doris Garraway and Christiane Rey, Department of French and Italian, with Dominique Licops (French and Italian) and Mimi Brody (The Block Museum)

Post date: Fri, 04/23/2010 - 10:56

Friday, April 30

Location:  Block Cinema, Northwestern University, Evanston Campus

5:00             Man by the Shore (Raoul Peck, 1993, France/Haiti, color, 106 minutes)

7:00             Moloch Tropical (Raoul Peck, 2009, France/Haiti, color, 107 minutes)

In the weeks since the apocalyptic disaster that claimed thousands of lives and left countless wounded and homeless, Haiti has been made visible to Western eyes primarily as a victim, once again, of chance, poverty, and underdevelopment. In response to the tragedy and the general vacuum of knowledge about Haiti that it has exposed, this film series will present provocative and enlightening works produced by, for, or about Haitians prior to the earthquake.

This program seeks to raise awareness of the country’s history, cultural traditions, contemporary geopolitical predicament, and struggle for democracy, and to open up a dialogue about the future of cultural expression in Haiti. Films include the Chicago premiere of Moloch Tropical, the latest film by acclaimed Haitian director, Raoul Peck, and several award-winning documentaries on Haitian visual arts, literature, religion, politics and society.

Films will be screened in French, Creole and English, with English subtitles.

Organized by Doris Garraway and Christiane Rey, Department of French and Italian, with Dominique Licops (French and Italian) and Mimi Brody (The Block Museum)

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