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Post date: Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:11

Feinberg's Global Health Day 2015

GUEST SPEAKER: Rebecca Singer
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières


Rebecca Singer is a doctorally prepared nurse with over a decade of experience in humanitarian response and development work. She has spent nearly five years with MSF, providing services to survivors of sexual and family violence in Liberia, Kenya, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Zimbabwe, and Papua New Guinea. She also worked with survivors of torture who had immigrated to the United States, ensuring that they had adequate health care. Ms. Singer has worked with several development organizations dedicated to improving coffee farmers' lives, and was the executive director of Coffee Kids until March 2015.

In many of the countries where Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works, a shocking number of women die each day from preventable deaths. MSF nurse and Chicago resident, Rebecca Singer, will talk about some of the most vital but often neglected areas of women's health, and what still needs to be done to address the medical needs of women and children around the world.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Presentation
Title: Because Tomorrow Needs Her
Date: Wednesday, September 9, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Williams Auditorium, McGaw Pavilion 240 E. Huron St, Chicago, IL 60611
RSVP: RSVP Online

Organized by: Feinberg Center for Global Health

Post date: Tue, 08/18/2015 - 16:06

Seminar: Friday September 11, 12-1PM
Facilitator: Marissa Boeck, MD, MPH, Global Health Fellow
Title: What is Global Health? A Brief History
Location: Feinberg Pavilion, Conference Room F

Organized by: Feinberg Center for Global Health

Link to Event

Post date: Thu, 07/23/2015 - 10:28

Andrew Solomon is a writer and lecturer on politics, culture and psychology.

Solomon’s newest book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity, published on November 13, 2012, won the National Book Critics Circle award for nonfiction; the J. Anthony Lukas award; the Anisfield-Wolf Award; the Wellcome Book Prize; Books for a Better Life Award; Yale University’s Research Advocacy Award; the GRASP Friend and Benefactor award; the Fountain House Humanitarian Award; the Mike Wallace Award of the University of Michigan; the Columbia Gray Matters Award; the Green Carnation Prize; and the Distinguished Achievement Award in Nonfiction of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency.

It was chosen as one of the New York Times Ten Best Books of 2012 and has been a New York Times bestseller. Additionally, it has been a New York Times daily (Dwight Garner) Best Book of 2012; a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2012; a Boston Globe Best Book of 2012; a San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2012; a Salon.com / Laura Miller Best Book of 2012; a Kirkus Best Nonfiction Book of 2012; a Time magazine Best Book of 2012; an Amazon.com Best Nonfiction Book of 2012; a New York Times Book Review Notable Book of 2012; a BuzzFeed Book of the Year; an Economist Book of the Year; and a Cleveland Plain-Dealer Book of the Year.

It tells the stories of parents who not only learn to deal with their exceptional children, but also find profound meaning in doing so. Solomon’s startling proposition is that diversity is what unites us. He writes about families coping with deafness, dwarfism, Down syndrome, autism, schizophrenia, multiple severe disabilities, with children who are prodigies, who are conceived in rape, who become criminals, who are transgender. While each of these characteristics is potentially isolating, the experience of difference within families is universal, as are the struggles toward compassion and the triumphs of love Solomon documents in every chapter. Woven into these courageous and affirming stories is Solomon’s journey to accepting his own identity, which culminated in his midlife decision, influenced by this research, to become a parent.

The New York Times hailed the book, writing, “It’s a book everyone should read… there’s no one who wouldn’t be a more imaginative and understanding parent — or human being — for having done so… a wise and beautiful book.” People described it as “a brave, beautiful book that will expand your humanity.”

Solomon’s previous book, The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression (Scribner, 2001), won the 2001 National Book Award for Nonfiction, was a finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize, and was included in The Times of London‘s list of one hundred best books of the decade. A New York Times bestseller in both hardcover and paperback editions, The Noonday Demon has also been a bestseller in seven foreign countries, and has been published in twenty-four languages. The New York Times described it as “All-encompassing, brave, deeply humane… a book of remarkable depth, breadth and vitality… open-minded, critically informed and poetic all at the same time… fearless, and full of compassion.”

The Noonday Demon was named a Notable Book by both the New York Times and the American Library Association, and received the Books for a Better Life Award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society; the 2002 Ken Book Award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness of New York City; Mind Book of the Year; the Lambda Literary Award for Autobiography/Memoir; and Quality Paperback Book Club’s New Visions Award. Following publication of The Noonday Demon, Solomon was honored with the Dr. Albert J. Solnit Memorial Award from Fellowship Place; the Voice of Mental Health Award from the Jed Foundation and the National Mental Health Association (now Mental Health America); the Prism Award from the National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association; the Erasing the Stigma Leadership Award from Didi Hirsch Mental Health Services; the Charles T. Rubey L.O.S.S. Award from the Karla Smith Foundation; and the Silvano Arieti Award from the William Alanson White Institute.

A native New Yorker, Andrew Solomon attended the Horace Mann School, graduating cum laude in 1981. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Yale University in 1985, graduating magna cum laude, and later earned a Master’s degree in English at Jesus College, Cambridge. While at Cambridge, he received the top first-class degree in English in his year, the only foreign student ever to be so-honored, as well as the University writing prize. In August 2013, he was awarded a Ph.D. in psychology at Jesus College, Cambridge, Faculty of Politics, Psychology, Sociology and International Studies, working on maternal identity under the supervision of Prof. Juliet Mitchell.

In 1988, Solomon began his study of Russian artists, which culminated with the publication of The Irony Tower: Soviet Artists in a Time of Glasnost (Knopf, 1991). He was asked in 1993 to consult with members of the National Security Council on Russian affairs. His recently reissued first novel, A Stone Boat (Faber, 1994), the story of a man’s shifting identity as he watches his mother battle cancer, was a national bestseller and runner up for the Los Angeles Times First Fiction prize; it has since been published in five languages.

From 1993 to 2001, Solomon was a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine, writing on a wide range of subjects; he has also written periodically for The New Yorker. Such journalism has spanned many topics, including depression, Soviet artists, the cultural rebirth of Afghanistan, and Libyan politics.

In 2003, Solomon’s article, “The Amazing Life of Laura,” a profile of diarist Laura Rothenberg, received the Clarion Award for Health Care Journalism, and the Angel of Awareness Award from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. In April 2009, his article, “Cancer & Creativity: One Chef’s True Story,” received the Bert Greene Award for Food Journalism by the International Association of Culinary Professionals; the story was also a finalist for the 11th Annual Henry R. Luce Award. Solomon’s reminiscence on a friend who committed suicide won the Folio Eddie Gold Award in 2011.

He has authored essays for many anthologies and books of criticism, and his work has been featured on National Public Radio’s Moth Radio Hour.

Solomon is an activist and philanthropist in LGBT rights, mental health, education and the arts. He is founder of the Solomon Research Fellowships in LGBT Studies at Yale University, and a member of the boards of directors of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and Trans Youth Family Allies. A frequent writer on gay marriage, his articles on the subject have appeared in Newsweek, The Advocate, and Anderson Cooper 360. His July 2007 marriage to John Habich was reported in the New York Times, The London Sunday Times, Tatler, Newsweek, and numerous other publications. The wedding ceremony that he wrote for that occasion has been used as a sample text in a University of Pennsylvania Law School course on privacy and civil rights law.

He has lectured widely on a range of topics. He is a lecturer in Psychiatry at Weill-Cornell Medical College; a director of the University of Michigan Depression Center and Columbia Psychiatry; a member of the Board of Visitors of Columbia Medical School, and the Advisory Boards of the Mental Health Policy Forum at Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. In 2008, Solomon received the Society of Biological Psychiatry’s Humanitarian Award for his contributions to the field of mental health, and in 2010, the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation’s Productive Lives Award. In 2011, he was appointed Special Advisor on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Mental Health at the Yale School of Psychiatry.

Additionally, Solomon serves on the boards of the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the World Monuments Fund; Yaddo; and The Alex Fund, which supports the education of Romani children. He is a member of the Library Council Steering Committee at the New York Public Library. He is also a fellow of Berkeley College at Yale University, and a member of the New York Institute for the Humanities and the Council on Foreign Relations.

He lives with his husband and son in New York and London and is a dual national. He also has a daughter with a close friend; mother and daughter live in Fort Worth, but visit often.

 This event is organized by the  Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities  and co-presented by the Family Action Network.

Post date: Thu, 07/23/2015 - 10:24

Feinberg's Global Health Day 2015

GUEST SPEAKER: Rebecca Singer
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières


Rebecca Singer is a doctorally prepared nurse with over a decade of experience in humanitarian response and development work. She has spent nearly five years with MSF, providing services to survivors of sexual and family violence in Liberia, Kenya, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Zimbabwe, and Papua New Guinea. She also worked with survivors of torture who had immigrated to the United States, ensuring that they had adequate health care. Ms. Singer has worked with several development organizations dedicated to improving coffee farmers' lives, and was the executive director of Coffee Kids until March 2015.

In many of the countries where Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works, a shocking number of women die each day from preventable deaths. MSF nurse and Chicago resident, Rebecca Singer, will talk about some of the most vital but often neglected areas of women's health, and what still needs to be done to address the medical needs of women and children around the world.

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Presentation
Title: Because Tomorrow Needs Her
Date: Wednesday, September 9, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Williams Auditorium, McGaw Pavilion 240 E. Huron St, Chicago, IL 60611
RSVP: RSVP Online

Global Health Poster Session
Date: Wednesday, September 9, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Method Atrium, Tarry Research & Education Building 300 E. Superior St, Chicago, IL 60611
RSVP: RSVP Online

Northwestern University Feinberg Center for Global Health
Contact: elizabeth.christian@northwestern.edu
Link to Event 

Post date: Mon, 07/13/2015 - 09:44

Please Save the Date and let us know your best time.

The Center for Global Health is pleased to co-sponsor this unique opportunity to be trained as a facilitator in our new global health simulation curriculum.
 
There is a great need for training in global health ethics among healthcare trainees and professionals working abroad. Simulation has been shown to be an effective teaching modality in the training of health professionals.  Northwestern University is piloting a project called Ethics Simulation in Global Health (ESIGHT). 
 
Faculty participants will facilitate debriefing sessions for medical trainees and residents through a series of simulations that use high fidelity techniques and standardized actors to replicate the “look” and “feel” of highly difficulty ethical dilemmas commonly encountered in resource-constrained settings. 
 
Phuoc Le, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at UCSF, and Assistant Professor at the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health, will be joining us and sharing his expertise in leading Global Health Ethics simulations.

Organized by: The Center for Global Health              
 

Post date: Mon, 05/18/2015 - 13:34

Conflict Zones and Zones of Conflict: War, Peace and the Continuum of Sexual Violence in Eastern Africa
June 12, 2015

Whereas before the 1990s mainstream human rights rejected the notion that privately inflicted violence against women was a human rights concern, violence against women is now framed internationally as the leading cause of women’s poor health and mental well-being and a financial burden to society more broadly. East and Central Africa have been the impetus and programmatic focus of much of this shift in the aftermath of the genocide in Rwanda, ongoing massive sexual violence in DR Congo and international advocacy concerning female genital cutting and early marriage. Advocacy efforts have addressed all forms of sexual and gender based violence that affect women in war and peace with initiatives to expand the positive human rights of women, including rights to equality, to reproductive and sexual health, and to participate in all spheres, including reconstruction, peace, and development.

While initial efforts in East and Central Africa focused on tertiary prevention such as psychosocial and criminal justice (DRC, Kenya, Sudan, Uganda and CAR), there is now greater recognition that pernicious societal injustices contribute to a continuum of sexual and gender based violence in refugee camps, settlement communities and the aftermath of conflict. There is growing consensus of the need to move beyond “conflict exceptionalism” and focus instead on the contexts of social injustice. As the focus of international protection programs shifts to address the social and cultural contexts of gender justice, there is much to learn about the ways in which communities themselves can and do serve as the agents of change. Specifically, little is know about community-based protection, i.e., the ways in which East and Central African refugee communities contribute to the protection and/or harm of women in host and resettlement contexts.

This one-day workshop draws upon case studies of East and Central African refugee women in the United States and Kenya in order to (1) critically examine the social contexts of injustice, (2) examine the efficacy of public health (financial ‘burden of disease’) and human rights (social justice) based approaches, (3) consider how advocacy framings and narratives of sexual and gender based violence can work as a community-based approach and, ultimately, (4) enlarge our understandings of community-based approaches in “zones of conflict” such as refugee camps, urban areas and resettlement communities by raising questions for future research.

Lunch Served

Speakers

Habon Daud (Somali Advisory Council, Minn.)
Aimee Hilado (RefugeeOne)
Carol Pavlish (Public Health, UCLA)
Michael Penn (Psychology, Franklin & Marshall Collge)
Anne Ream (Voices and Faces Project)
Alisa Roadcup (Heshima Kenya)
Galya Ruffer (Northwestern University)
Leslie Thomas (ArtWorks Project)

Organized by: The Center for Forced Migration Studies, The Program of African Studies, and the Buffett Institute for Global Studies

Link to Event

Post date: Mon, 05/18/2015 - 13:27

One Step Before's annual Medical School and Health Professions Day is Saturday, May 23 from 10:30am-4:00pm on the 2nd floor of Norris. Come speak with representatives from over 20 medical, dentistry, nursing, PT programs and more! Meet students from Feinberg School of Medicine as they assist with our suture clinic and participate in a medical student panel. Drop in and speak with dental students from UIC and attend a lecture from an A.T. Still University Admissions rep. Don't miss out on this incredible opportunity for pre-health students!Inline image 2Inline image 1

Post date: Thu, 04/23/2015 - 12:11

Teju Cole was born in the US, raised in Nigeria, and currently lives in Brooklyn. His first novel, Open City, was awarded the Rosenthal Family Foundation Prize of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the New York City Book Award for Fiction, and the Internationaler Literaturpreis; nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the New York Public Library’s Young Lions Award, and a prize from the Royal Society of Literature; and named one of the best books of 2011 by, Newsweek, the Guardian, the Atlantic, the New York Times, and many others. His novella, Every Day Is for the Thief, has been "widely praised as one of the best fictional depictions of Africa in recent memory" (The New Yorker) and was named one of the best books of the year by the New York Times, the Telegraph, the Globe and Mail, and NPR.

Cole is a contributor to many leading journals and magazines. He has lectured widely on a variety of subjects, from contemporary ethics to literary studies, and is currently working on two books, a non-fiction narrative of Lagos, and a photographic project about Switzerland. He recently exhibited his photographs in a show titled "Who's Got the Address?" He teaches literature and art history at Bard College, where he is Distinguished Writer in Residence and Achebe Fellow.

Organized by: Global Enagegement at the Buffett Center

Link to Event

Post date: Thu, 04/23/2015 - 12:08

The Northwestern University Global Health Interdisciplinary Symposium will take place in Chicago on November 19 and 20, 2015. The central goal of this two-day symposium is to catalyze the exchange and cross pollination of ideas and research on the interdisciplinary factors, impediments, and solutions to the advancement of global health. We believe that where multiple perspectives come together around some of the world’s largest problems, we will find the greatest potential for impactful global health solutions.

Keynote Sopeaker:

Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of The Earth Institute at Columbia University, Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Development and Health Policy and Management, Special Advisor to United Nations on the Millennium Development Goals

Thursday, Nov 19 | 12pm | Thorne Audiorium, Chicago Campus

Jeffrey Sachs is the Director of The Earth Institute at Columbia University, as well as Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Development and Health Policy and Management. He is also the Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on the Millenium Development Goals. He is co-founder and Chief Strategist of Millennium Promise Alliance, and is director of the Millennium Villages Project. Sachs is also one of the Secretary-General’s MDG Advocates, and a Commissioner of the ITU/UNESCO Broadband Commission for Development. He has authored three New York Times bestsellers in the past seven years: The End of Poverty (2005), Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet (2008), and The Price of Civilization (2011). His most recent book is To Move the World: JFK’s Quest for Peace (2013). A world-renowned professor of economics, Dr. Sachs is a leader in sustainable development, senior UN advisor, bestselling author, and syndicated columnist whose monthly newspaper columns appear in more than 100 countries. He has twice been named among Time Magazine’s 100 most influential world leaders. He was called by the New York Times, “probably the most important economist in the world,” and by Time Magazine “the world’s best known economist.” A recent survey by The Economist Magazine ranked Professor Sachs as among the world’s three most influential living economists of the past decade.m

Link to Symposium

Post date: Thu, 04/23/2015 - 12:03

Rebecca Seligman is a medical and psychological anthropologist who studies mental health in cross-cultural perspective. Her work examines the social and political-economic forces that affect the experience and distribution of mental and physical illness, with an emphasis on physical processes and mechanisms. Her current research includes work on the links between diabetes and depressed affect among Mexican Americans, as well as an investigation of the disproportionately high levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality among Latino youth in the US. She is the author of Possessing Spirits and Healing Selves: Embodiment and Transformation in an Afro-Brazilian Religion.

Buffett Institute Faculty & Fellows Colloquium

Link to Event

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